Renters living in a detached home may have to deal with a seasonal chore that renters in apartments usually do not – getting rid of the leaves in your yard. Whether this fall is the first time you’re going to have to handle piles of leaves or you just want to know the best way to get rid of them, we have everything you need to know.

The classic rake

When you think about the best way to get rid of leaves, you probably envision a classic rake – the most used tool used for leaf removal.

The most common type of rake is the fan rake with plastic or metal prongs that extend outwards from the pole in the shape of a fan. There are other types of rakes on the market, but the fan is generally the most effective.

A leaf blower

The name “leaf blower” clearly implies what the tool is used for but so often we see it being used to remove grass clippings, debris from the deck or patio, or even clearing out your gutters. If you aren’t into the manual labor of raking leaves, the leaf blower might be just what you’re looking for. Since a leaf blower does much of the work for you, you can remove leaves from a large yard in a much shorter amount of time. If you have a large yard, a leaf blower is definitely the fastest way to get rid of leaves. For the biggest of yards, you may consider investing in a backpack leaf blower.

A yard vacuum

Before you get out the Hoover, you should understand we’re talking about a different type of vacuum. Just like a vacuum cleaner picks up the small dirt particles in your carpet, a yard vacuum picks up leaves and other small pieces of debris from the grass.

Yard vacuums store collected debris in a large, attached bag. Some models will mulch the debris you pick up. And some models can also pick up trash, nuts and other debris in addition to leaves. You should do some research on yard vacuums before deciding which one is best for your needs.

If you have a small yard, you can reportedly use a shop vac for the same purpose.

Where to put them

Collecting all of the fallen leaves in your yard is only half of the battle. You still have to find somewhere to put them all.

Some of the methods we listed will leave you with mulch that you can leave behind in the yard. However, most methods will leave you with whole leaves.

One easy way to deal with collected leaves is to gather them on a tarp in your yard. Once the tarp is full, you can simply wrap up the corners and drag it to where you need it to go — perhaps the curbside, a composting pile or to an incinerator. This is also super helpful for large yards as you can tackle the project in quadrants and move the tarp to where you’re working.

It may seem easy, but think twice about burning your leaves. The rules are different for each county and town, so double check to make sure you won’t be slapped with a fine.

Everything else

Leaves should be removed at least twice per season. You’re probably going to be tempted to let every single leaf fall, but that will result in a mess. If your yard has more trees, you’ll probably need to do it more than twice.

If you’re going to be mulching your leaves, make sure the layer of mulch left behind is not so thick that you can’t see the blades of grass peeking through. If you can’t see your grass, you’ve left too much mulch behind.

If you choose to compost your leaves, you can have fertilizer within three months if you’re careful. In the summer, fall and spring, turn your compost regularly to speed up the process. In the winter, however, don’t turn the leaves at all. In the cooler months, compost needs all the heat it can get and turning the pile releases much of that heat.

Photo by Hermes Rivera on Unsplash

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